Cinematography

Yesterday Conann was discussing Cinematography and showing us some beautiful examples of good cinematography for us to carry through into our paintings in our ‘New World’ projects for Creative Elements. One particular cinematographer who i thought was great was Roger Deakins. He did the cinemaotgraphy for The Secret Garden, The Shawshank Redemption, Wall-e, How to Train Your Dragon, Skyfall and many more amazing films. However, Conann showed us some of his work from True Grit (2010),  and i was amazed, the shots he captured were beyond beautiful. Image

The light beaming through these windows in the dusty room is just beautiful.  Capturing the golden, warm colours really sets the mood. 

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When seeing a landscape image like this, i truly understand the need for widescreen film. 

Another film by him i adore is Skyfall. I remember watching it in the cinema and just thinking, wow, this is incredible. 

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the opening credits were entertaining, beautiful and had me glued to the screen.

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Again Deakins uses strong light beaming through windows to create a strong silhouetted figure.

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Only someone with great talent can strategically create an image in darkness and highlight in such a skillful way. It truly is inspiring. 

After becoming so inspired i decided to go to the library and took out the book ‘Cinematography Theory and Practice, Image Making for Cinematographers and Directors’ by Blain Brown. 

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Already from only reading the first few pages, its a great help and opening my mind to new possibilities. It is making me think of the image im creating completely differently. When i make my film/painting etc i need to take into account…

  • The Frame
  • Light and Colour
  • The Lens
  • Movement
  • Texture
  • Establishing
  • POV

Splitting things into the rule of thirds helps me visualize what i’m trying to create much better. Something people seem to overlook is in thinking that this is only important in photography, or only important in live action, as you can see here, it is always important. 

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The main thing i feel i need to focus on is light and colour, what makes an image go pop? What leads you into the image? IS there only one basic colour from dark to light? Is it an array of colour? Where is the light coming from? and why?

This is something i feel i personally need to research to become better at not just film making but painting and photography. 

Something i hadnt even picked up on until a few years ago was filters in film, or one colour scheme throughout, i find it it be beautiful and is something i want to focus on now, take Pans Labyrinth for example, the entire film has a cold blue/grey or golden filter.

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And take Honeydripper for example, it takes its name literally bringing warm honey shades into the film throughout. 

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Other films focus only on one colour for a specific effect, a very basic idea of this comes to mind from Schindlers List. This film is done fully in black and white until we see a lone child in a scene of war disaster, this childs coats red colour is kept fully saturated in the film. It represents so much more than just highlighted an innocent child, the red represents the fear, anger, blood, love and loss of war. 

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We later see a body in a red coat along with the other dead bodies in a cart being took to the incinerator, the first time i saw this film i cried my eyes out when i realized this revelation. This really does show how use of colour can be used for more than just an aesthetically pleasing image. 

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I am looking forward to reading the rest of my book and hope to learn and work well from what i am learning.

 

 

 

 

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